FAQ

Battery Chemistry

Invented by the French physician Gaston Planté in 1859, lead acid was the first rechargeable battery for commercial use. Despite its advanced age, the lead chemistry continues to be in wide use today. There are good reasons for its popularity; lead acid is dependable and inexpensive on a cost-per-watt base. There are few other batteries that deliver bulk power as cheaply as lead acid, and this makes the battery cost-effective for automobiles, golf cars, forklifts, marine and uninterruptible power supplies (UPS).

The grid structure of the lead acid battery is made from a lead alloy. Pure lead is too soft and would not support itself, so small quantities of other metals are added to get the mechanical strength and improve electrical properties. The most common additives are antimony, calcium, tin and selenium. These batteries are often known as “lead-antimony” and “lead­calcium.”

The early gelled lead acid battery developed in the 1970s converts liquid electrolyte into a semi-stiff paste by mixing the sulfuric acid with a silica-gelling agent. AGM arrived later and both gel and AGM batteries offer slight differences in performance. Cashing in on these unique characteristics; the gel batteries are commonly used in UPS, big and small, while AGM has carved out a market with starter and deep-cycle applications. Gel and AGM batteries are part of the vale-regulated lead acid (VRLA) family.

I am text block. Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

I am text block. Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

I am text block. Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

I am text block. Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

I am text block. Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

Lithium Batteries

Lithium batteries have higher voltage, wider temperature range, long time durability and higher energy density which make them available to use longer than other batteries.

Great care should be taken when disposing of lithium batteries. If there is any unused electricity capacity in the battery and the battery’s positive and negative terminals happen to come into contact with other metal parts during disposal, then there is a risk of heat generation, breakage or even fire.  Therefore, it is recommended that any business should employ the services of a professional handling company on a service contract basis, in order to safely manage all battery disposal.

Lithium primary batteries use lithium in it’s pure metallic form whereas a lithium rechargeable battery uses lithium compounds that are much more stable. This means that it is designed specifically to be recharged hundreds of times, whereby a standard lithium primary battery should always be disposed of and never recharged.

Other Frequently Asked Questions

Generally, an alkaline battery is what is known as a primary battery. This means that it can be used once and then thrown away. A rechargeable battery however, (also known as a secondary battery) contains reversible chemical materials. Therefore, it can be recharged and used time and time again.

Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) and Nickel Cadmium (NiCd) batteries are both rechargeable and are interchangeable in most applications. However, the NiMH batteries have a better energy density and are also more environmentally friendly. This is due to the fact they do not contain heavy cadmium, but instead use a hydrogen absorbing alloy which is much lighter.

Generally, nickel metal hydride batteries are more sensitive to prolonged overcharge than nickel cadmium batteries. Therefore, they will have a reduced cycle life if they are subjected to long periods of extended overcharge. However, overcharging is just one factor that contributes to the cycle life performance. Usage patterns and storage conditions are all factors that effect how long a battery will last. Providing you subject your batteries to typical usage conditions, you should find that you can recharge them hundreds of times.

When charging batteries, it is perfectly normal for the battery to become warm, as it is simply the energy that the charger is putting into the battery. After charging has been completed, the battery should return to room temperature within a few minutes.

In general, a nickel metal hydride battery will retain around 70% of it’s original charge for a period of approximately 6 months. This is, of course dependent upon the battery being kept in typical storage conditions.

The higher the capacity of a battery, the longer it will take to charge. Most battery chargers have a constant charging current – which means that the process of putting energy back into the cell is done so at a constant speed.

Memory effect is what happens when a battery has been repeatedly charged whilst it still has some energy remaining. This is why you should always discharge a battery entirely before recharging. These days, however, this is not so much of an issue as significant improvements in electrode manufacturing technologies means that batteries have a greater tolerance to being recharged before fully discharged.

Trickle charge is a low rate charge that is specifically used to simply top up a battery to it’s full capacity.

A smart charger is a charging device that monitors a battery’s state of charge, enabling it to terminate the charge when it is complete. This limits the problems that can be caused by overcharging and subsequentlyextends the life of the battery.

Providing your batteries are stored in typical environmental conditions, they can be stored for up to 5 years.

Yes, all devices can function when powered by rechargeable batteries. However, some devices will perform more effectively with a primary battery. Rechargeable batteries are more appropriate when used for constant, high drain applications.

In terms of waste batteries, it is dependent upon individual country regulations as to whether or not a battery is defined as hazardous. Therefore, you should check your local regulations before disposing of your waster batteries.